Nations at COP26 have not yet been able to reach consensus on key issues needed to keep on track the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees and, with less than five hours to go before the official 6pm deadline, countries’ representatives are making their last-minute interventions.

Oil and gas producer Norway wants the final agreement from COP26 to send a “strong, ambitious and clear” message “that world leaders “intend to keep 1.5 degrees alive”.

A member of the Norwegian ministerial delegation in its intervention early Friday afternoon to climate change summit president Alok Sharma, said that while the nation welcomed the stated move to phase out fossil fuel subsidies, it would prefer the word ‘inefficient’ removed from the ultimate text.

The first draft of the 'cover decision' on Wednesday called for nations "to accelerate the phasing out of coal and subsidies for fossil fuels".

However, come Friday morning following protracted overnight ministerial negotiations, a subsequent watered down draft refers to “unabated coal power”, such as those without carbon capture, and “inefficient subsidies”.

The Norwegian delegation member added that the final COP text should be “very strong on mitigation efforts”.

“We have to act in the 2020s otherwise adaptation will be too costly” for some nations, he said.

Norway would like also to see more specifics on ecosystems and natural sinks [for carbon sequestration] in the final documentation.

Meanwhile, the Marshall Islands in its intervention also called on other world leaders to strengthen the language relating to the phasing out of coal-fired power and fossil fuel subsidies in the final documentation.

“Fossil fuel subsidies are paying for our own destruction,” a Marshall Islands ministerial delegation member said.

Peru also the COP text to go further.

“1.5 [degrees Celsius] requires the full phase out of coal and fossil fuel subsidies,” said the lady delivering the nation’s intervention.

The EU too wants to see “stronger action” on coal power and fossil fuel subsidies detailed in the final COP26 agreement.

However, at this stage, it seems likely that the watered-down wording of Wednesday’s initial draft – the first time coal and fossil fuels were specifically mentioned in COP documentation - will be incorporated in the eventual text; much to the anger of climate change organisations.

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“We are witnessing the ‘great Glasgow get-out’. After making a series of flashy announcements full of caveats and loopholes, rich countries and the UK COP Presidency are rushing to close a deal that heaps responsibility for emissions cuts on developing countries, without providing the money they need to move away from fossil fuels,” said Sara Shaw, climate justice and energy co-coordinator for Friends of the Earth International.

“At COP25 in Madrid, big polluters like Shell, Total and BP launched offsetting schemes for so-called ‘nature-based solutions’. Now, at COP26 we see nature-based solutions in all but name bang in the middle of the draft agreement. But there simply aren’t enough land and trees in the world to soak up the emissions that big polluters are planning,” said Shaw.

While some delegations’ members believe there are too many unresolved issues for the 6pm timeline to be met, others would like to see the final text delivered by then and Sharma has made no bones over his desire and intention to achieve that.

“To extend to tomorrow would be a failure in itself,” said a ministerial representative from Kenya.

“It is a good draft that we must adopt.”

Nations at COP26 are still unable to reach consensus on key issues needed to keep on track the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees and, with less than five hours to go before the official 6pm deadline, countries’ representatives are making their last-minute interventions.

Oil and gas producer Norway wants the final agreement from COP26 to send a “strong, ambitious and clear” message “that world leaders “intend to keep 1.5 degrees alive”.

A member of the Norwegian ministerial delegation in its intervention early Friday afternoon to climate change summit president Alok Sharma, said that while the nation welcomed the stated move to phase out fossil fuel subsidies, it would prefer the word ‘inefficient’ removed from the ultimate text.

He added that the final COP text should be “very strong on mitigation efforts”.

“We have to act in the 2020s otherwise adaptation will be too costly” for some nations, he said.

Norway would like also to see more specifics on ecosystems and natural sinks [for carbon sequestration] in the final documentation.

Meanwhile, the Marshall Islands in its intervention also called on other world leaders to strengthen the language relating to the phasing out of coal-fired power and fossil fuel subsidies in the final documentation.

“Fossil fuel subsidies are paying for our own destruction,” a Marshall Islands ministerial delegation member said.

Peru also the COP text to go further.

“1.5 [degrees Celsius] requires the full phase out of coal and fossil fuel subsidies,” said the lady delivering the nation’s intervention.

The EU too wants to see “stronger action” on coal power and fossil fuel subsidies detailed in the final COP26 agreement.

However, at this stage, it seems likely that the watered-down wording of Wednesday’s initial draft – the first time coal and fossil fuels were specifically mentioned in COP documentation - will be incorporated in the eventual text; much to the anger of climate change organisations.

“We are witnessing the ‘great Glasgow get-out’. After making a series of flashy announcements full of caveats and loopholes, rich countries and the UK COP Presidency are rushing to close a deal that heaps responsibility for emissions cuts on developing countries, without providing the money they need to move away from fossil fuels,” said Sara Shaw, climate justice and energy co-coordinator for Friends of the Earth International.

“At COP25 in Madrid, big polluters like Shell, Total and BP launched offsetting schemes for so-called ‘nature-based solutions’. Now, at COP26 we see nature-based solutions in all but name bang in the middle of the draft agreement. But there simply aren’t enough land and trees in the world to soak up the emissions that big polluters are planning,” said Shaw.

While some delegations’ members believe there are too many unresolved issues for the 6pm timeline to be met, others would like to see the final text delivered by then and Sharma has made no bones over his desire and intention to achieve that.

“To extend to tomorrow would be a failure in itself,” said a ministerial representative from Kenya.

“It is a good draft that we must adopt.”

“All of us today will have to make certain concessions” if we are not going to drag out the process, admitted a member of the Russian ministerial delegation.

“All of us today will have to make certain concessions” if we are not going to drag out the process, admitted a member of the Russian ministerial delegation.